2011 Resolutions

11.061 Urging Congress to Enact Legislation to Clarify that Natural Gas Storage Well Safety Should be Regulated by the States
11.062 Supporting Continued Environmentally Responsible Development of Unconventional Oil from Shale Formations in the United States


IOGCC Resolutions
Bismarck, North Dakota 


Resolution 11.061
Urging Congress to Enact Legislation to Clarify that Natural Gas Storage Well Safety Should be Regulated by the States

WHEREAS, the underground storage of natural gas within an interstate transportation system is a vital process to ensure efficient development and production of domestic natural gas resources; and 

WHEREAS, for decades natural gas transportation companies have integrated underground natural gas storage into their interstate pipeline operations to increase deliverability and decrease overall costs; and

WHEREAS, there are about 120 entities that currently operate the nearly 400 active underground storage facilities in the lower 48 states. In turn, these operating entities are owned by, or are subsidiaries of, fewer than 80 corporate entities; and

WHEREAS, many states have adopted rules and regulations regarding the safe operation of underground natural gas storage facilities; and

WHEREAS, the member states of the IOGCC have trained personnel to actively and effectively regulate the safe underground storage of natural gas,

WHEREAS, a recent federal court ruling in Kansas has brought into question the authority of states to regulate underground natural gas storage facilities.

WHEREAS, legislation by Congress is needed to clarify that natural gas storage well safety should be regulated by the states;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission hereby declares its support for legislation providing natural gas storage well safety be regulated  under state authority.


Resolution 11.062
Supporting Continued Environmentally Responsible Development of Unconventional Oil from Shale Formations in the United States

WHEREAS,  the United States relied on oil for 36 percent of its total energy supply in 2010, and demand for oil as an energy source is expected to increase in the upcoming decades; and

WHEREAS, oil provides more than 95 percent of the United States’ transportation energy supply; and

WHEREAS, oil, in addition to being a significant component of our energy supply, is a critical raw material used in many commercial, industrial, residential and agricultural applications, including chemicals, plastics, fertilizers, and pharmaceuticals; and 

WHEREAS, by 2035 domestic production of oil is expected to increase nearly 10 percent and imports decrease more than 5 percent due to development of unconventional oil from shale formations; and 

WHEREAS, oil from shale formations is expected to be the fastest growing source of global oil supplies during the same timeframe; and

WHEREAS, concerns have been expressed over potential impacts of developing unconventional oil from shale formations associated with hydraulic fracturing, infrastructure, development in urban areas, and related issues; and 

WHEREAS, the member states of the Interstate Oil and Compact Commission (IOGCC) have effective regulatory systems that protect water, air, soils and other resources as well as public health and safety; and

WHEREAS, it is crucial for U.S. citizens, policy-makers, and lawmakers to understand the importance of unconventional oil from shale formations to our economy and energy security, as well as the state regulatory safeguards in place to minimize impacts from shale oil exploration and production; and

WHEREAS, the IOGCC would like to form a Shale Oil Directors Task Force to address emerging issues associated with development of unconventional oil from shale formations; 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the IOGCC, that development of unconventional oil from shale formations should be encouraged under conditions that protect the environment and public health and safety; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the IOGCC, while believing no further studies are necessary, urges the EPA to provide for the states to participate as a partner should any new studies be undertaken on the environmental impacts of developing unconventional oil from shale formations.