2010 Resolutions

10.111 Updated Policy Statement On The Issues of CO2 Storage In Underground Geologic Formations
10.112 Renewed Urging For The Continued Development Of An Effective National Energy Policy
10.113 Establishing An IOGCC Task Force to Determine the Applicability of the Federal Pipeline Safety Act to Storage of Underground Natural Gas
10.114 Identifying and Promoting Energy Human Resources Needs
10.115 Renewed Support Of A Congressional Appropriation for Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation under Provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 
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IOGCC Resolutions

2010 Annual Meeting
Tucson, Arizona

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10.111
Updated Policy Statement On The Issue Of CO2 Storage In Underground Geologic Formations
 

WHEREAS, there is significant interest within both industry and government in the capture and geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2); and  

there is significant interest within both industry and government in the capture and geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2); and  

WHEREAS, the long-term geological storage of CO2 has potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere; and  

WHEREAS, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) in December 2002 established a Geological Sequestration Task Force and in October 2004 created the follow-up IOGCC Carbon Capture and Storage Task Force to examine the technical, policy, and regulatory issues related to safe and effective CO2 storage in the subsurface, whether for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery or for storage, and to prepare model regulatory guidelines concerning geologic storage to assist member states in regulating the injection and underground storage of CO2; and   

WHEREAS, the IOGCC has published recommended regulatory and statutory guidelines on geologic storage of CO2 and these guidelines comprehensively address the protection of groundwater and other geologically hosted resources ; and 

WHEREAS, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will adopt rules for geologic storage of CO2 under the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program; and,  

WHEREAS, the IOGCC desires to continue the efforts of the IOGCC Carbon Capture and Storage Task Force to continue to facilitate coordination and cooperation among IOGCC member states, the Association of American State Geologists, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and other organizations with an interest in injection of CO2 into underground geologic formations; to further develop and define public policy; and to refine the regulatory frameworks for geologic storage and transportation systems for CO2;  

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the IOGCC will continue to represent the States in collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy, and others in the areas of policy,  regulatory development,  and technology initiatives’ associated with CO2 storage.  

NOW, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the IOGCC urges the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to continue to provide future support for continued initiatives promoting the development of rational and experience-based regulatory frameworks and infrastructure to enable development of safe and environmentally sound CO2 storage projects and transportation systems for CO2 transmission.

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10.112
Renewed Urging For The Continued Development Of An Effective National Energy Policy 

WHEREAS, the United States of America is dependent on adequate, affordable energy supplies from diverse sources for continued economic stability and growth, national security, and maintenance and enhancement of its citizens’ quality of life; and 

the United States of America is dependent on adequate, affordable energy supplies from diverse sources for continued economic stability and growth, national security, and maintenance and enhancement of its citizens’ quality of life; and 

WHEREAS, domestically produced natural gas and oil provide jobs and economic opportunity to the people of the states and are critical parts of the nation’s energy needs; and 

WHEREAS, according to the Energy Information Administration’s latest estimate, the demand for clean-burning natural gas is projected to remain relatively steady through the year 2028; and  

WHEREAS, volatile energy prices, as well as our nation’s dependence on approximately 52% of our oil from foreign sources have a detrimental effect on the U.S. economy and security; and 

WHEREAS, funding for oil and natural gas research and development has been greatly reduced and, in some cases eliminated, in both the private and governmental sectors, thereby curtailing activities and initiatives that lead to new technologies that increase domestic oil and gas production; and 

WHEREAS, a recent federal inventory of U.S. oil and gas resources concluded that  60% of the onshore federal lands that have potential as domestic sources of oil and natural gas to meet our nation’s energy needs are presently closed for leasing, resulting in 62% of the oil and 41% of the natural gas being inaccessible for development; and 

WHEREAS, the infrastructure necessary for the transportation of oil and natural gas from remote sources to the areas in which it is consumed is desperately lacking and needs federal support and funding,  

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission urges the President and Congress to continue to develop and adequately fund an effective national energy policy that will:

1. Provide access to federal lands, as appropriate under protocols of wise stewardship and compatible use, for the development of oil and gas resources, utilizing technologies proven to be environmentally sound, 

2. Support and encourage research and development of new technologies that benefit efficient and effective exploration and development for oil and natural gas resources, 

3. Support enhancement of the infrastructure for the transportation of oil and natural gas in the United States,

4. Streamline, to the degree possible, the process used to approve oil and gas permitting in all federal agencies having authority to grant permits and approvals, and 

5. Support each state’s rights to oversee the oil and natural gas regulatory process.

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10.113
Establishing An IOGCC Task Force to Determine the Applicability of the Federal Pipeline Safety Act to Storage of Underground Natural Gas 
 

WHEREAS, the underground storage of natural gas within an interstate transportation system is a vital process to ensure efficient development and production of domestic natural gas resources; and 

WHEREAS, for decades natural gas transportation companies have integrated underground natural gas storage into their interstate pipeline operations to increase deliverability and decrease overall costs; and  

WHEREAS, there are about 120 entities that currently operate the nearly 400 active underground storage facilities in the lower 48 states. In turn, these operating entities are owned by, or are subsidiaries of, fewer than 80 corporate entities; and 

WHEREAS, many states have adopted rules and regulations regarding the safe operation of underground natural gas storage facilities; and 

WHEREAS, a recent federal court ruling in Kansas has brought into question the authority of states to regulate underground natural gas storage facilities. 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission will establish the Natural Gas Storage Regulatory Task Force to study this issue and bring recommendations for further action to the commission for consideration.  Members of this task force shall be appointed by the Vice Chairman of the Commission with the concurrence of the Chairman and shall make its report to the Vice Chairman by April 1, 2011. 

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10.114 
Identifying and Promoting Energy Human Resources Needs  

WHEREAS, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) is recognized as a national leader in identifying petroleum Human Resources needs; and 

WHEREAS, the Petroleum Professionals Blue Ribbon Task Force, convened by then Governor John Hoeven of North Dakota, developed recommendations for state, federal and industry actions; and 

WHEREAS, domestically produced natural gas and oil provide jobs and economic opportunity to the people of the states and are critical parts of the nation’s energy needs; and 

WHEREAS, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) published Employment Growth: Oil Industry Focus, a step by step guide on how North Dakota state government and industry collaborated under the leadership of Governor John Hoeven to find blue collar workers for vital energy industry positions; and 

WHEREAS, a stable and skilled domestic petroleum workforce is critical to continued, environmentally sound development of natural gas and oil resources in the United States; and 

WHEREAS, the need for an abundant, well trained workforce of professional and blue collar members has also been recognized by industry groups, educational institutions, and the states,  

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the IOGCC will continue the efforts identified by the Petroleum Professionals Blue Ribbon Task Force and in Employment Growth: Oil Industry Focus to include: 

Developing strategies to further the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Task Force; 

Supporting proposals to address the blue collar job needs of the domestic oil and gas industry; and 

Encouraging the President and administration to work with the IOGCC in identifying and adopting solutions to the identified Human Resources problems.

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10.115
Renewed Support Of A Congressional Appropriation for Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation under Provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005

WHEREAS, geological and geophysical data, such as rock cores, cuttings, samples, geophysical well logs, seismic records and other data, provide the basic framework information necessary to discover and develop the oil and gas and other energy resources of the United States; and, 

WHEREAS, geological and geophysical data are used extensively in domestic exploration and production activities to develop prospects and design development programs; understand geologic and engineering characteristics and conditions of hydrocarbon reservoir rocks, source rocks, and related strata; and for other applications and purposes, and;

WHEREAS, there is significant long term benefit to the Nation and the states in the preservation of these data, as well as in ensuring that they are accessible for examination and study in support of discovery and development of the United States’ domestic oil and gas resources, thereby helping to ensure that American consumers have reliable and affordable supplies of oil and natural gas; and,  

WHEREAS, nationwide, geological and geophysical data are in jeopardy owing to the general lack of adequate resources and facilities to catalog, document, archive, and make these important data available for use and study; and, 

WHEREAS, most states, including the member states of the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), have state agencies or entities, such as state geological surveys, that serve, or potentially serve, as repositories for geological and geophysical data; and,

WHEREAS, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 authorizes an appropriation of $30 million per year directed toward geological and geophysical data preservation by Federal government entities and the states; and,   

WHEREAS, the Association of American State Geologists (AASG), along with other entities and organizations, is providing leadership in an effort to secure appropriations for the U.S. Congress to fund the Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation initiative at the authorized level; and,  

WHEREAS, the IOGCC desires to express its strong support for the Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation initiative and to join the AASG and other entities and organizations in the effort to obtain Federal appropriations for this effort; 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the IOGCC urges the Congress of the United States of America to appropriate funds to support the Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation initiative at its authorized level; 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the IOGCC will support and assist the AASG and others in efforts to promote the Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation initiative and secure Congressional appropriations to fund the program.

 

10.051 Acknowledging The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioner’s (NARUC) successful completion of its July 18, 2007, Moratoria Resolution
10.052  Urging the Congressional Conference Committee on Bill H.R. 2996 and the Environmental Protection Agency to Remain Within the Scope of the Directive to EPA

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IOGCC Resolutions

2010 Midyear Issues Summit
Lexington, Kentucky

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10.051
Acknowledging The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioner’s (NARUC) successful completion of its July 18, 2007, Moratoria Resolution

WHEREAS, NARUC adopted a resolution on July 18, 2007 entitled, “Developing Reliable Research Regarding the Social, Economic and Environmental Effects of Maintaining Domestic Energy Exploration and Production Moratoria On and Beneath Federal Lands”; and

WHEREAS, The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) adopted Resolution 07.095 supporting NARUC’s moratoria research resolution in September of the same year; and

WHEREAS, the NARUC resolution called for a Study Group to be formed, “…as determined appropriate and responsive to the spirit of this Resolution….”; and

WHEREAS, NARUC’s President recruited the Chairman of the Committee on Gas to serve as Chairman of a Moratoria Study Group and authorized staff support and funding pursuant to the resolution; and

WHEREAS, the IOGCC was represented by Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Chairman Dan Seamount and Texas Railroad Commission Chairman Victor Carrillo on the Study Group during various phases of the project; and

WHEREAS, economists from federal agencies, universities and the private sector; NARUC commissioners and commissioners emeritus; IOGCC Commissioners, financial supporters and representatives of non-governmental organizations participated in this highly scrutinized, public interest, broad-based study; and

WHEREAS, the Study Group presented final research product findings on February 15, 2010, in conjunction with NARUC’s Winter Meeting in Washington D.C. and on March 6, to the Washington D. C. assembly of Energy Council members, including IOGCC representatives; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED, That the Board of Directors acknowledges NARUC’s successful completion of a research project which could materially assist decision makers in more accurately, logically and reasonably developing the nation’s energy policy; and be it further

RESOLVED, That the Board of Directors commends the Moratoria Study Group, including IOGCC participants, for their combined and successful efforts to fulfill the task set forth by the 2007 NARUC and IOGCC Resolutions; and be it further

RESOLVED, That the Board of Directors authorizes staff to immediately distribute this resolution along with a copy of the Moratoria Study’s Executive Summary to: NARUC, IOGCC Governors; IOGCC Official Representatives; Presiding officers of the various state legislative houses within IOGCC states; the President; Secretaries of Interior, Energy and Commerce; and every Member of Congress.

History: Submitted by Dan Seamount, Official Representative, Alaska, April 7, 2010
Approved by Business Committee, May 25, 2010, Lexington, Kentucky

 

 

 

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10.052
Urging the Congressional Conference Committee on Bill H.R. 2996 and the Environmental Protection Agency to Remain Within the Scope of the Directive to EPA

WHEREAS, the United States Congress charged the EPA “to carry out a study on the relationship between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water, using a credible approach that relies on the best available science, as well as independent sources of information. The conferees expect the study to be conducted through a transparent, peer-reviewed process that will ensure the validity and accuracy of the data. The Agency shall consult with other Federal agencies as well as appropriate State and interstate regulatory agencies in carrying out the study, which should be prepared in accordance with the Agency's quality assurance principles;” and,

WHEREAS, comments to the EPA Science Advisory Board from many parties urged EPA to not unnecessarily and unreasonably expand the scope of the study; and,

WHEREAS, the United States Congress, in the Energy Policy Act of 2005, clarified that the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) does not cover hydraulic fracturing; and,

WHEREAS, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) conducted a survey of oil and gas producing states and found no cases of ground water contamination associated with hydraulic fracturing; and,

WHEREAS, the member states of the IOGCC have adopted comprehensive laws and regulations to provide for safe operations and to protect the nation’s drinking water sources, and maintain staffs of well trained personnel to effectively regulate oil and gas exploration and production and to insure compliance; and,

WHEREAS, hydraulic fracturing is currently, and has been for decades, a common well completion technique allowed by state rules and regulations and used in hydrocarbon production by the oil and gas industry in the 30 member states of the IOGCC without detrimental impact to ground water; and,

WHEREAS, approximately 35,000 wells are hydraulically fractured annually in the United States and close to one million wells have been hydraulically fractured in the United States since the technique’s inception, with no known harm to ground water; and,

WHEREAS, the regulation of oil and gas exploration and production activities, including hydraulic fracturing, is a power and responsibility of the various states; and,

WHEREAS, the SDWA does not grant to the federal government authority to regulate oil and gas drilling and production operations, such as hydraulic fracturing, under the Underground Injection Control program; and,

WHEREAS, production of coal seam natural gas, natural gas from shale formations and natural gas from low permeability reservoirs is increasingly important to domestic natural gas supply and will be even more important in the future to reduce this nation’s dependence on unreliable energy sources and to increase our national security; and,

WHEREAS, hydraulic fracturing plays a major role in the development of virtually all unconventional oil and gas resources and, thus, should not be limited in the absence of any evidence that such fracturing impacts underground sources of drinking water;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, the IOGCC hereby declares its support for the study as defined by the Congressional Conference Committee on Bill H.R. 2996 directive to EPA;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the IOGCC urges the EPA to specifically seek the advice and close participation of the states, expressly the oil and gas regulatory agencies, in the design and execution of this study.

History: Submitted by Lynn Helms, Official Representative, North Dakota, April 20, 2010
Approved by Business Committee, May 25, 2010, Lexington, Kentucky